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Oct 23

Falling life expectancy and the collapse of the United States

Gennaro Carotenuto

According to studies conducted separately by Columbia University and the World Health Organization, the United States has, in only ten years, gone from the 24th to the 49th in the world rankings of life expectancy. That is, to live around 4.5 years less than the long-living Japanese or 2.2 years less than the Italians, located in the twentieth place.

In 1960, U.S. citizens were in fifth place, behind Scandinavian countries and Holland and Australia. It took 40 years to lose 19 places and only 10 in fall another 25. Among the causes of the collapse of their real life expectancy are obesity, smoking, alcoholism, poor nutrition, improperly treated diseases, violence and other problems typical of countries that have a much worse index of human development.

And it is no longer taboo, even in major newspapers, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, to talk openly of the decline of the country of Barack Obama, who begins the ninth year of the war in Afghanistan. Even in some cases, the situation is described as nothing less than “the collapse of American empire.”

Various statistics, similar to those of life expectancy, confirm a seemingly unstoppable deterioration of the quality of life: at the end of 2009, the National Center for Health Statistics placed the country in the position of 30th in the world in infant mortality, one of the basic parameters of development. U.S. newborns die for reasons similar to those of adults, due to an inadequate way of life, “poverty.” The number of premature born is one of the leading causes of infant mortality, and it is more than twice that of Finland.

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