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Apr 06

Anonymous: We hacked 300 Chinese government, commercial sites

By Agence France-Presse

A masked hacker, part of the Anonymous group, pictured in Lyon, France in January 2012. The hacking group Anonymous has claimed it has hacked 300 Chinese websites in recent days, including government and commercial sites, in protest at web censorship in the country. [AFP photp]

The hacking group Anonymous has claimed it has hacked 300 Chinese websites in recent days, including government and commercial sites, in protest at web censorship in the country.

According to messages posted on the group’s Twitter account this week, the latest of which was on Thursday, Anonymous said it had defaced the sites with comments in English and Chinese.

Some of the messages were directed at the Chinese people while others addressed the government.

One read: “To the Chinese people: your government controls the internet in your country and tries to filter what he sees as a threat to him.”

Another said: “Dear Chinese government, you are not infallible, today websites are hacked, tomorrow it will be your vile regime that will fall.”

A list of the websites hacked was published on pastebin.com. However a number of the sites appeared to be running normally late Thursday.

[Source]


Group Claiming to be ‘Anonymous’ Attacks China, Govt Websites Hacked

Hundreds of Chinese websites have been hacked by people claiming to be the local branch of the hacktivist group Anonymous. The stated final goal of the attacks is to start a revolt against the government.

The number of sites attacked may be as high as 500. They include government, company and general-purpose pages.

In at least one case the hacking resulted in release of 548 phone numbers and 860 email addresses, apparently belonging to Chinese officials.

The people behind the attacks say their effort is aimed at undermining the Chinese government, which they accuse of suppressing freedoms and say should be overthrown by a popular revolt.

“In the defacings and leaks on this day, we demonstrate our revolt against the Chinese system. It has to stop! We aren’t asking you for nothing, just saying ‘protest, revolt, be the free person you always wanted to be!’” one of the anonymous comments on the Pastebin website rallied.

The cyber offensive kicked off in late March with the creation of as an Anonymous China Twitter account, endorsed by YourAnonNews. The new group already has almost 2,000 followers on Twitter.

China maintains tight control over the national segment of the internet. The government suppresses online material deemed harmful to public order. Those range from any references to separatist movements in Tibet to the strangest rumors that often spread like wildfire across China’s microblogging services.

[Source]

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