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Apr 15

Inherited Memories In Organ Transplant Recipients

What is “Cellular Memory”?

“Cellular memory” is a theory that states the brain is not the only organ that stores memories or personality traits, that memory as a process can form in other systems in the body and can be stored in organs such as the heart. This theory is not new. Imaginative fiction writers probably were writing about the concept as early as the 1800′s, long before transplants of anything were even considered plausible. Perhaps it was Maurice Renard’s Les Mains d’Orlac that popularized the idea for the first time. In the story a pianist looses his hands and a killer’s hands are transplanted in their place. Of course the story has been spoofed and remade so many times in our own culture there’s scarcely anyone that doesn’t know how the story ends, with the killer’s hands possessing the main character to kill. This is an extreme and over simplified version of what cellular memory could be. In our modern culture where organ transplants are being done daily we have yet to come up with a case such as the above mentioned but we have stumbled onto some pretty strange coincidences. First studied in heart transplant recipients Cellular Memory was noted when upon waking up from surgery patients would display a strange change in tastes, opinions, cravings, and other mild personality changes. Could it be the organs given to them had some part of the donor’s memory left within it?

Do different organs have their own souls?

Modern Examples

Most examples of cellular memory in transplant patients are recorded by scientists doing studies, with the aid of a hospital system that forbids the transplantee to know or speak to the donor’s family. Because of this most of the cases are written of without the use of names, leaving these patients stories at large but still in obscurity.

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